TACTICS THAT LEAD YOU TO FINDING YOUR PURPOSE AND PASSION IN LIFE

 
KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK
KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

Hey Tribe!

It's been a while – welcome to my first post of 2019!

Have you ever experienced holiday laziness, usually prior to Thanksgiving and post New Year, where you just want to lie on the couch and do absolutely nothing?!

Glad you could relate because, same here.

My obstacle here, though, is that what was meant to be a couple of weeks of celebration, —soon turned into a month of what I'd consider a "free subscription trial" to my new year.

You know, the kind Netflix or Hulu gives you? Except, this applied to my life — I renewed my membership in February 2019.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

In my state of lethargy — all in the name of unmerited self-care —I stumbled upon various Instagram posts, curated by resolutionists (yup, new word, who dis?), who illustrated their endless yearly recaps in their Stories or sent subliminal messages to the "friends" they were leaving behind the minute the clock struck 12:00 am.

Through the eye rolling and sighing scrolls of these annual self-praising accolades, a series of posts did in fact stand out in a very positive way. They consisted of one potentially life-changing word, accompanied with a heart-felt caption of why that particular verb represented their entire year or the upcoming one.

So now that the champagne flutes have been drained, and the confetti swept away, let's talk about some developmental tactics (inspired by these posts) you should be using, to find your purpose and passion in life.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

INVESTMENT

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

Although it's a common practice for many people, it took reading many self-developmental books to realize that spending money into my skills, professional, and personal growth, would eventually yield future returns and even current rewards. If there's a word I wholeheartedly stood by last year, —as I am sure you noticed in a few blogposts—it was investment.

Paying for a better quality of life is never a waste of time nor money.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

Purchase books, sign up for courses, go to seminars or attend conferences filled with people who are where you'd like to be. It'll be a constant reminder that you shouldn't reach for that exit strategy you desperately think of when things seem to fail — because no matter how massive they are, your dreams are valid.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

Then transform your investment into habits; I promise you, with consistency, future you will thank you for your willingness and capacity to invest into present you.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

INTENTIONALITY

Why is it that we wait for a life-changing experience, may it be celebratory or chaotic, for us to change our mindset? We force ourselves to get things together, only to fall back into old habits within a few weeks. While these environments help shape our gratitude or failures, it's imperative to always have intentionality.

When you have intentions behind the things you do — regardless of the environment you're in, you're never shaken by the alterations of your journey because the end goal isn't the be-all.

I learned the very hard way that having intentions during the process, not merely a purpose, is in fact the most important part of the journey.

It's okay to have intentions every step of the way and enjoy the process, too.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

BOUNDARIES

Having been raised in a culture where respect is one of the priorities in familial values, the line between setting boundaries and being rebellious were often blurred. I was raised, like many foreigners, with the concept that my elders held some type of authority and had the last say.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

As I grew from a very expressive child who was labeled as mischievous, into an empathetic adult, I often found myself battling between saying no and pacifying my emotions at the expense of my well-being. I frequently found myself saying yes to commitments, with people I wasn't really fond of, for the sake of not hurting their feelings.

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

What eventually worked for me, when I didn’t want to blatantly say no — and trust me, this no longer is an issue — is letting people know that I’d get back to them with an answer. This erases the pressure of impulsively committing forces me to actually think about my decision before diving in.

Though I am extremely grateful for my upbringing and how my culture has molded me, abundance, even of great things, prevents them from being valued.

So yes, respect people — from elders and adolescents to CEOs’s and janitors — but set boundaries and say no sometimes!

You’ll find yourself having the time to do the things you actually want instead of what others need from you.

DISCUSSION

KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK
KHAKI MONOTONE LOOK

What is your word for 2019? What are some factors that drove you to make that decision?

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